2000-lightyearsfromhome:

© Alécio de Andrade
© Frederick Wilfred

'Hum strews his body along the ruddy shore,

and wants no part of what he cannot be. He is the draught quenched of his absence. He is the flame and body leaping - squinching and quenching in its infinite measures. He is the ichor bile of the tower of saints.  

Into me too someone I is peering.

And when that peering turns away,

withdraws its presence from this body,

the life that guides the hand that writes this

shall vanish and be no more.’

First Reflection 1939 
Photo: Lisette Model 
Silenus
Piero di Cosimo - La Découverte du miel
Georges Braque, Nude Study, c. 1908
The First Photograph of a Human Being
"This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy who invented the daguerreotype process of photography. 
Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being. 
Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.”The First Photograph of a Human Being
"This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy who invented the daguerreotype process of photography. 
Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being. 
Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.”The First Photograph of a Human Being
"This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy who invented the daguerreotype process of photography. 
Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being. 
Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.”
Giorgio Ghisi